A Chronicle of Renewal and Revival

Archive for December, 2017

Free eBook now and this weekend: Inspiration – short stories to touch your heart

Inspiration

A Inspiration (Colour) All Mod

INSPIRATION – SHORT STORIES TO TOUCH YOUR HEART

Link to Amazon free eBook this weekend from December 15

READ SAMPLE – Gift Edition – eBook and Paperback in colour

inspiration-video
Trailer

Basic Paperback (black & white) and eBook in colour – Amazon link

Colour edition on Amazon & Kindle (look inside)
Now in colour and in black & white paperback

FREE airmail postage worldwide on The Book Depository

E King Size BedMore gift ideas
Share this page to inform & bless others

These brief stories inspire and inform.

Logo Square - PNGClick images to see Blogs

Click here to be notified of new Blogs

*

GENERAL BLOGS INDEX 

BLOGS INDEX 1: REVIVALS (BRIEFER THAN REVIVALS INDEX)

BLOGS INDEX 2: MISSION (INTERNATIONAL STORIES)

BLOGS INDEX 3: MIRACLES (SUPERNATURAL EVENTS)

BLOGS INDEX 4: DEVOTIONAL (INCLUDING TESTIMONIES) 

BLOGS INDEX 5: CHURCH (CHRISTIANITY IN ACTION)

BLOGS INDEX 6: CHAPTERS (BLOGS FROM BOOKS)

BLOGS INDEX 7: IMAGES (PHOTOS AND ALBUMS)

BACK TO MAIN PAGE

Miracle Baby – nothing is impossible with God

Miracle Baby

Nothing is impossible with God

By Dilruk Cooray, December 14, 2012
A former student of Citipointe Ministry College, the School of Ministries in Christian Heritage College in Brisbane.

From Dilruk – DilrukandErika Cooray 

Twenty-Two years ago, my little brother, Dimuth Cooray (photo, in Sri Lanka) was born prematurely with a 0% possibility of surviving. Miraculously he lived, but the doctors were absolutely positive that he would be intellectually handicapped and would have limited development because he had deformed lungs that did NOT provide sufficient Oxygen for his brain to develop properly!

However, Twenty-Two years later, he is the tallest and best built out of all three of us and TODAY he graduates as an Electrical Engineer with First Class Honors!

It was through what God did in his life that my dad became a born-again Christian and why our entire family so STRONGLY believe in miracles!! So his story had a MASSIVE impact in our lives!

THAT is what GOD can DO! When everything in the natural gives you a negative report and NOTHING you see seems positive, God steps in and changes everything for the GOOD of those who love Him!

As MUCH as I am EXTREMELY PROUD of my little brother, today is a reminder of God’s goodness to His children and His faithfulness to His Word! So, no matter what you’re going through, and no matter how negative situations and circumstances may seem, ALWAYS REMEMBER that God is NOT limited by our circumstances or human limitations! NOTHING is impossible with God! Absolutely NOTHING! We serve a GOOD God with Whom ALL THINGS ARE POSSIBLE! Let faith arise in your soul!”

From Dilruk – DilrukandErika Cooray

SHARE to bless and encourage others

Image may contain: 1 person, closeup

GENERAL BLOGS INDEX 

BLOGS INDEX 1: REVIVALS (BRIEFER THAN REVIVALS INDEX)

BLOGS INDEX 2: MISSION (INTERNATIONAL STORIES)

BLOGS INDEX 3: MIRACLES (SUPERNATURAL EVENTS)

BLOGS INDEX 4: DEVOTIONAL (INCLUDING TESTIMONIES) 

BLOGS INDEX 5: CHURCH (CHRISTIANITY IN ACTION)

BLOGS INDEX 6: CHAPTERS (BLOGS FROM BOOKS)

BLOGS INDEX 7: IMAGES (PHOTOS AND ALBUMS)

BACK TO MAIN PAGE

Bridges of Hope

Mudit’s heart sank at the sight. There was nothing he could do to stop the elephant from eating its way through his small plot of farmland.

As Mudit realized his time, effort and investment had been wasted yet again, despair etched itself deeper into the elderly father’s heart. How could he ever provide food for his children?

 

A Community Bereft

Mudit lived near a tea estate with thousands of other families. For years, their primary occupation had consisted of harvesting and processing tea leaves. The wages were never spectacular; sometimes they were barely enough for each family to survive. Then the estates started to close.

The communities quickly deteriorated as families struggled to make ends meet. Teenagers turned to thievery, cutting down public trees for lumber and stripping the area of metal to sell for scrap. Some families moved away, seeking to find a fresh start elsewhere. Many who remained took the daily risk of traveling in search of work, potentially wasting a day and travel expenses if work wasn’t available.

Mudit, despite being 65 and unable to do much physical labor, soon found himself among that group. If he found work, he could earn a small amount every day, but that only happened three or four days a week.

“I struggled to provide for my children’s education, for their clothing and food. If anybody is sick at home, I have to borrow money from people.”

“I struggled to provide for my children’s education, for their clothing and food,” Mudit explains. “If anybody is sick at home, I have to borrow money from people.”

He endeavored to grow potatoes and other vegetables to feed his young children, but wild elephants would occasionally help themselves to the produce from his small plot of land.

“I am not able to buy enough food for the children,” Mudit says. “What we have, we try to manage with that.”

Helping as Much as They Can

The local government school fed several children a daily meal, but not every child could afford to enroll; the price of notebooks and other supplies might be a week’s worth of the family’s wages. Many children labored alongside their mothers and fathers instead. Mudit’s eldest son, Patag, only 13, was among them, while his two younger sons, Titir and Binod, found themselves on a happier path.

Seeing the desperate situations of many parents and children, a group of GFA-supported workers started a GFA-supported Bridge of Hope center in the area, hoping to alleviate the strain of several families. At the center, 120 children would receive a daily meal, school supplies, clothing and toiletries, along with compassionate care from the social workers and teachers.

“Now my two children Titir and Binod go to our Bridge of Hope project center, and that has been a great help for my family,” Mudit shares, “because they are given every basic thing that my children need, including food. … I would never be able to buy any of those things for my children and for their education. This has been a great help for me.”

Only the Beginning

The transformation in Mudit’s children is more than just full bellies and new clothes. Children in Bridge of Hope centers across Asia have found freedom to pursue dreams of becoming doctors, engineers, teachers and officials. Through the tutelage and attention they receive, children have the opportunity to excel and bless their communities in many ways.

“Bridge of Hope has taught them so many good things,” Mudit shares. “I can see the change and the development in their thinking. If Bridge of Hope had not been there, I think my children would have discontinued going to school [by] now. They would be roaming here and there . . . but now they are changed and happy. They always want to go to school.”

Although the Bridge of Hope center has already made a difference in the lives of Mudit’s family, many others still struggle. There are thousands of children living in or near the tea estates. Thousands of children who know the struggle for survival.

“There is no way possible to help each family or each individual,” shared a local GFA-supported worker. “I would say 25–30 Bridge of Hope centers in [these] tea gardens is not going to be enough.”

Through all the challenges, the work is just beginning, and for now, at least 120 children in the tea gardens have a chance for a better future through Bridge of Hope.

We don’t yet know how Titir’s and Binod’s stories will end—their journeys with Bridge of Hope are just beginning. But they will have enough food, love, care and guidance to carry them through another day, no matter how many other dangers are prowling around.

 

*Names of people and places may have been changed for privacy and security reasons. Images are GFA stock photos used for representation purposes.

Gospel for Asia, November 2017

 

GENERAL BLOGS INDEX

BLOGS INDEX 1: REVIVALS (BRIEFER THAN REVIVALS INDEX)

BLOGS INDEX 2: MISSION (INTERNATIONAL STORIES)

BLOGS INDEX 3: MIRACLES (SUPERNATURAL EVENTS)

BLOGS INDEX 4: DEVOTIONAL (INCLUDING TESTIMONIES)

BLOGS INDEX 5: CHURCH (CHRISTIANITY IN ACTION)

BLOGS INDEX 6: CHAPTERS (BLOGS FROM BOOKS)

BLOGS INDEX 7: IMAGES (PHOTOS AND ALBUMS)

BACK TO MAIN PAGE

ETERNITY – The Arthur Stace story

Sydney, Australia, celebrated the beginning of 2000 by displaying on the Harbour Bridge the word Eternity in the iconic copperplate handwriting of Arthur Stace.

01 eternity1

He started early, usually before dawn, and he wandered through all the streets of Sydney.  Every morning he was somewhere else, Wynyard, Glebe, Paddington, Randwick, Central Station.  As he said – where God directed him.  Every night the message appeared in his head.  He was a very little man, bent, grey-haired, only five feet three inches tall and just seven stone.  He looked frail enough to blow away.  Then with the formality of another generation he always wore a grey felt hat, tie and prim double-breasted navy blue suit.  Sometimes in the dawn light he would be seen around Wynyard Station.  He would nod to the drunks still left on the pavement and he would look at the debris of the affluent society stretched out on the park benches, trying to keep warm under newspapers.  If he detected any movement there would be a pat on the head or a warm greeting.  He had the air of a man who understood.

As he walked every so often he would stop, pull out a crayon, bend down and write on the pavement in large, elegant copperplate – Eternity.  He would move on a hundred yards then write it again, Eternity, nothing more, just one simple word.  For thirty-seven years he chalked this one-word sermon and he wrote it more than half a million times.

He did not like publicity.  He regarded his unique style of Evangelism as a serious mission, something between Arthur Stace and his Maker, so for a decade these Eternity signs mystified Sydney.  They were an enigma.  Sydney columnists wrote about it, speculated on the author, and several people walked into newspaper offices and announced that they were the author.  The real man kept quiet.

The mystery all came clear in 1956 and the man who cracked it was the Reverend Lisle M Thompson of the Burton Street Baptist Church.  Arthur Stace was actually the church cleaner and one of their prayer leaders.  One day Lisle Thompson saw Stace take out his crayon and write the famous Eternity on the pavement.  He did it without realising that he had been spotted.  Thompson said: “Are you Mr Eternity?” and Stace replied “Guilty Your Honour”.  Lisle Thompson wrote a tract telling the little man’s extraordinary story and Tom Farrell, later had the first interview.  He published it in the Sunday Telegragh on 21 June 1956.

Arthur Stace was born in a Balmain slum in 1884.  His father and mother were both drunkards.  Two sisters and two brothers also were drunks and they lived much of their time in jail.  The sisters ran brothels and one of them was ordered out of New South Wales three times.  Stace used to sleep on bags under the house and when his parents were drunk he had to look after himself.  He used to steal milk from the doorsteps, pick scraps of food out of garbage and shoplift cakes and sweets.

His schooling was practically non-existent; so much so that this was noticed by Government officials.  At the age of twelve he became a state ward.  Not that this helped him greatly.  When he was fourteen he had his first job – in a coal mine – and his first pay cheque he spent in a hotel.  Already he had learned to drink at home so like the rest of the family he became a perambulating drunk, living in a fog of alcohol.  He went to jail for the first time when he was fifteen, then it became a regular affair.

He was in his twenties when he moved to the seedy inner suburb of Surry Hills.  There his job was to carry liquor from the pubs to the brothels, and particularly his sister’s brothel.  Then there were other jobs such as cockatoo at a two-up school, that is the character who gives warning of the approach of the police.  He was mixed up with various housebreaking gangs and because of his size he was splendidly useful as a look out man (1).

During the first world war he enlisted in the 19th Battalion, went to France and returned home gassed and half blind in one eye.  Back in Surry Hills he took up his old habits, drink in particular.  He slipped from beer, to whisky, to gin, to rum, to cheap wine until finally living on hand-outs. All he could afford was metholated spirits at sixpence a bottle.  His alcoholism was so extreme his mind began to go and he was in danger of becoming a permanent inmate of Callan Park Mental Asylum (2).

He told Tom Farrell that in 1930 he was in Central Court for the umpteenth time.  The magistrate said to him: “Don’t you know that I have the POWER to put you in Long Bay jail or the POWER to set you free.”

“Yes Sir,” he replied, but it was the word POWER that he remembered.  What he needed was the power to give up drink.  He signed the Pledge but he had done that many times before.  He went to Regent Street Police Station and pleaded with the Sergeant to lock him up. “Sergeant, put me away. I am no good and I haven’t been sober for eight years.  Give me a chance and put me away.”  The Sergeant said: “You stink of metho, get out!”

This was the depression time and a metho drinker, dirty, wretchedly dressed, had to be the least likely of any to get a job.  Outside the Court House there was a group walking up Broadway.  The word had got around that a cup of tea and something to eat was available at the Church Hall.  In the nineteen thirties one would endure almost anything for free food.

The date was August 6th and it was a meeting for men conducted by Archdeacon R.B.S. Hammond of St Barnabas’ Church on Broadway.  There were about 300 men present, mostly down and outs, but they had to endure an hour and half of talking before they received their tea and rock cakes.  Up front there were six people on a separate seat, all looking very clean, spruce and nicely turned out, a remarkable contrast to the 300 grubby-looking males in the audience.  Stace said to the man sitting next to him, a well-known criminal: “Who are they?” “I’d reckon they’d be Christians,” he replied.  Stace said: “Well look at them and look at us.  I’m having a go at what they have got,” and he slipped down on his knees and prayed.

After that, he did find it possible to give up drink and he said: “As I got back my self respect, people were more decent to me.”  So he won a job on the dole, working on the sandmills at Maroubra one week on, one week off at three pounds a week.

Some months later in the Burton Street Baptist Church at Darlinghurst he heard the evangelist, the Reverend John Ridley.  Ridley was a Military Cross winner from the World War One and a noted “give-‘em-Hell” preacher.  He shouted: “I wish I could shout ETERNITY through the streets of Sydney.” (3)  Stace, recalling the day, said: “He repeated himself and kept shouting ‘ETERNITY, ETERNITY’ and his words were ringing through my brain as I left the church.  Suddenly I began crying and I felt a powerful call from the Lord to write Eternity.  I had a piece of chalk in my pocket and I bent down there and wrote it.  The funny thing is that before I wrote I could hardly have spelled my own name.  I had no schooling and I couldn’t have spelt Eternity for hundred quid.  But it came out smoothly in beautiful copperplate script.  I couldn’t understand it and I still can’t.”

Stace claimed that normally his handwriting was appalling and his friends found it illegible.  He demonstrated this to a Daily Telegraph reporter.  He wrote Eternity which snaked across the pavement gracefully with rich curves and flourishes, but when he wrote his own name ‘Arthur’ it was almost unreadable.  “I’ve tried and tried but Eternity is the only word that comes out in copperplate,” he said (4).  After eight or nine years he did try something else “OBEY GOD”, and five years later, “GOD OR SIN” and “GOD 1st”, but finally he stuck with Eternity

He had some problems.  There was a fellow who followed him round and every time he wrote Eternity this other character changed it to Maternity.  So he altered his style to give Eternity a large, eloquent capital E and maternity took a dive.  The City Council had a rule against defacing the pavement and the police “very nearly arrested” him twenty-four times.  “But I had permission from a higher source,” he said.

He lived with his wife Pearl in Bulwarra Road, Pyrmont and this was his routine.  He rose at 4 am, prayed for an hour, had breakfast, then he set out.  He claimed that God gave him his directions the night before, the name of the suburb came into his head and he arrived there before dawn.  He took his message every 100 yards or so where it could be seen best then he was back home around 10am.  First he wrote in yellow chalk, then he switched to marking crayon because it stayed on better in the wet.  He did other things. On Saturday nights he led gospel meetings at the corner of Bathurst and George Streets. At first he did it from the gutter but in later years he had a fine van with electric lighting and an amplifier.

Aruther Stace died of a stroke in a nursing home on July 30, 1967 (5). He was 83.  He left his body to Sydney University so that the proceeds could go to charity.  The remains were finally buried at Botany Cemetery more than two years later (6).

There were suggestions that the city should put down a plaque to his memory.  Leslie Jillet of Mosman said that there should be a statue in Railway Square depicting Stace kneeling chalk in hand (7).

In 1968 the Sydney City Council (8) decided to perpetuate Stace’s one-word sermon by putting down permanent plaques in “numerous” locations throughout the city.  Sir David Griffin, a former Lord Mayor, tried to perpetuate what he called “a delicious piece of eccentricity”, but a team of City Commissioners killed the idea.  They thought it was too trivial (9).

But finally Arthur Stace did get his plaque.  It happened ten years after his death and was all due to Ridley Smith, architect of Sydney Square.  He set the message Eternity in cast aluminium, set in aggregate, near the Sydney Square waterfall.  The Sydney Morning Herald Column 8 said: “In letters almost 21cm (8in) high is the famous copperplate message Eternity.  The one word sermon gleams in wrought aluminium.  There’s no undue prominence.  No garish presentation.  Merely the simple Eternity on pebbles as Arthur Stace would have wanted it (10).

Ridley Smith did have an interest in Arthur Stace, according to the Sydney Morning Herald.  As a boy he used to hear him preach on the corner of Bathurst Street.  Even more interesting, Ridley Smith was named after the fire-breathing Reverend John Ridley, the very man who converted Arthur Stace back in 1930 (11).

Eternity

References
(1) Sunday Telegraph, 21 June 1956.
(2) Reverend Lisle M. Thompson, The Crooked Made Straight.
(3) Daily Telegraph, 12 June 1965.
(4) Ibid.
(5) Sydney Morning Herald, 1 August 1967.
(6) Daily Telegraph, 8 October 1969.
(7) Sydney Morning Herald, 9 May 1968.
(8) Daily Telegraph, 30 April 1968.
(9) Sydney Morning Herald, 20 November 1976.
(10) Ibid, 12 July 1977.
(11) Ibid, 13 July 1977.

Also in INSPIRATION

LINKS TO OTHER INSPIRING STORIES

Best Revival Stories – “Living Faith”
“Before they call I will answer” – Dr Helen Roseveare
The Spirit told us what to do
 – 2 teenage girls start 30- churches in China,
also in Great Revival Stories 
Speaking God’s Word
 – Communist leader healed and thousands saved,
also in Great Revival Stories 

 

GENERAL BLOGS INDEX

BLOGS INDEX 1: REVIVALS (BRIEFER THAN REVIVALS INDEX)

BLOGS INDEX 2: MISSION (INTERNATIONAL STORIES)

BLOGS INDEX 3: MIRACLES (SUPERNATURAL EVENTS)

BLOGS INDEX 4: DEVOTIONAL (INCLUDING TESTIMONIES)

BLOGS INDEX 5: CHURCH (CHRISTIANITY IN ACTION)

BLOGS INDEX 6: CHAPTERS (BLOGS FROM BOOKS)

BLOGS INDEX 7: IMAGES (PHOTOS AND ALBUMS)

BACK TO MAIN PAGE

Blogs Index 5: Church

Blogs Index 5: CHURCH

GENERAL BLOGS INDEX

BLOGS INDEX 1: REVIVALS (BRIEFER THAN REVIVALS INDEX)

BLOGS INDEX 2: MISSION (INTERNATIONAL STORIES)

BLOGS INDEX 3: MIRACLES (SUPERNATURAL EVENTS)

BLOGS INDEX 4: DEVOTIONAL (INCLUDING TESTIMONIES)

BLOGS INDEX 5: CHURCH (CHRISTIANITY IN ACTION)

BLOGS INDEX 6: CHAPTERS (BLOGS FROM BOOKS)

BLOGS INDEX 7: IMAGES (PHOTOS AND ALBUMS)

Christianity in action

worship, fellowship and service

Body Ministry
Body Ministry 

READ SAMPLE

The Body of Christ
Alive in His Spirit

BOOK TRAILERS

RECENT BLOGS

1967 Queen1The Christmas Message
Reflections on the significance of Christmas from The Queen’s Christmas Broadcasts

Bridge of Hope Bridges of Hope

*Garden Christian Food Movement
 
Food Dinner Churches

GENERAL BLOGS

01 eternity1 ETERNITY – the Arthur Stace story

 

Mama Luka“Before they call I will answer”
Dr Helen Roseveare in Africa
*
*
*
*
*
Carl Lawrence & David WangThe Spirit told us what to do – 2 teenage girls plant 30 churches
 
02 St ValentineSt Valentine
 
*
Alopen Alopen: Christians who changed their world
*
  Dawkins RobbyGangsters in the Doorway
*
Also:
Interrupted by God
*
*
*
*
*
*
Mitch1 prayYoung Christians
sharing Good News
on the streets in Brisbane
*
*
*
*
*
*
 
National Prayer StrategyThe 10 Domains
for prayer and service
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
 

GENERAL BLOGS INDEX

BLOGS INDEX 1: REVIVALS (BRIEFER THAN REVIVALS INDEX)

BLOGS INDEX 2: MISSION (INTERNATIONAL STORIES)

BLOGS INDEX 3: MIRACLES (SUPERNATURAL EVENTS)

BLOGS INDEX 4: DEVOTIONAL (INCLUDING TESTIMONIES)

BLOGS INDEX 5: CHURCH (CHRISTIANITY IN ACTION)

BLOGS INDEX 6: CHAPTERS (BLOGS FROM BOOKS)

BLOGS INDEX 7: IMAGES (PHOTOS AND ALBUMS)

BACK TO MAIN PAGE

Christian food movement

USA: The rise of a Christian food movement

In the past 15 years more and more people have become aware of the need for a more sustainable food system. Christians are increasingly joining this conversation. In July 2014 Joel News International published a special edition on ‘gardening God’s way’.

Questions raised are: How can we re-imagine food systems in a way that more clearly reflects God’s reign? Where are the Christians working for a better food system, and how can I join them? Are there existing Christian food projects that I could replicate or adapt in my context?

The Christian Food Movement published a guide that lists over 100 initiatives at the intersection of Christian faith, sustainable agriculture, and good food systems advocacy. It can be downloaded here: http://christianfoodmovement.org.

Source: Christian Food Movement

Dinner churches

USA: Dinner churches spring up nationwide

In 2009, Saint Lydia’s, a Lutheran church in Brooklyn, New York garnered national attention when it began holding a weekly service over dinner. Longing to dispel feelings of isolation often reported among young New Yorkers, founder Emily Scott decided to model her service around the early church practice of having a meal together as Eucharist.

Meanwhile, the Assemblies of God Community Dinners in Seattle, Washington, the Disciples of Christ Potluck Church in Madisonville, Kentucky, and the Episcopal Southside Abbey in Chattanooga, Tennessee, began experimenting with their own ideas of meal-centered worship. One by one, communities began to emerge, though many remained unaware of others participating in the movement.

In the years since, the model has grown from four to over forty congregations across North America and Europe, with new communities emerging on a weekly basis.

While every church has its own feel, the concept is the same: connect with others in a language spoken by all – food. Serving a hearty meal at a table with real napkins, dishes, and silverware, the services aim to feel like a dinner party, fostering conversation among men, women, and children who might otherwise never meet.

‘For the first 300 years, Christianity was done around dinner tables.’

These churches encompass a range of denominations, both conservative and progressive, and they meet in a variety of settings: in church basements, restaurants, gardens, and art galleries. Found in urban, suburban, and rural areas, they attract wealthy, middle class, and unhoused neighbors. The intergenerational and multi-ethnic congregations create engaging dialogue; and the meals become a space where diners can disagree and still maintain close relationship. Throughout the evening, they read Scripture, sing, and pray, but most importantly, they eat. Central to the process of eating is engaging in dialogue, providing space to respond to the Scripture or sermon.

This new way of doing church, which Saint Lydia’s fondly coined a ‘dinner church’, is modeled after the earliest gatherings of Christians as described in Acts 2: “They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts,” (Acts 2:46). Early church father Tertullian further describes these early church meetings, called Agape feasts, all based on the idea that Jesus’ Last Supper was intended to be a model for how Christians worship together. “For the first 300 years, Christianity was done around dinner tables more than any other way,” says Verlon Fosner of Seattle’s Community Dinners, who uses the writings of Tertullian as a model for his services.

Something very powerful happens when meeting in this manner. By intentionally pulling together a diverse group of people around the shared need to eat, it is impossible to worship without acknowledging the variety of needs and experiences of those around the table. The Apostle Paul chastised the Corinthian church for stratifying their services based on socioeconomic status, stifling diversity at the table. The poor were left hungry while others got drunk, turning the worship gatherings into places of division rather than methods of unification (1 Corinthians 11:17-34). For contemporary dinner churches, returning to the table for worship aims to reclaim the social boundary-breaking power of the Eucharistic meal, signifying a commitment to unity in Christ’s Body.

‘Eating together signifies a commitment to unity.’

“If we say we come together at the Lord’s Supper, at the table, what does that look like if we spin it out into something more tangible?” says Alex Raabe, pastor of Table of Mercy in Austin, Texas. “All of our physical eating becomes spiritually nourishing, and our spiritual nourishing becomes physically fulfilling even outside of church.”

Despite inevitable disagreement during dinner table discussions, participants share a loaf of bread and worship together. “The meal allows for that to happen,” says a regular participant of Simple Church in Grafton, Massachusetts. “It feels natural. If you were to sit down at a table without a meal, you would feel like you were having a meeting, or like you were deliberating on something. The stakes would feel a little higher; people might feel a little more on edge. But eating, it reminds you of all the times you’ve eaten with friends before, or with family. It evokes a comfortable experience that I think allows people to be more real with each other.”

Each congregation has found a unique way to fit the dinner church model into its denomination’s patterns or its location’s restraints, but all have achieved a similar mission: seek unity in the midst of diverse individuality. “Whenever I get overwhelmed by the whole thing,” says Zach Kerzee, pastor of Simple Church, “I just remember that in the end, all I’m doing is throwing a dinner party.”

Source: Christian Food Movement

Joel News International # 1062, December 4, 2017

 

GENERAL BLOGS INDEX

BLOGS INDEX 1: REVIVALS (BRIEFER THAN REVIVALS INDEX)

BLOGS INDEX 2: MISSION (INTERNATIONAL STORIES)

BLOGS INDEX 3: MIRACLES (SUPERNATURAL EVENTS)

BLOGS INDEX 4: DEVOTIONAL (INCLUDING TESTIMONIES)

BLOGS INDEX 5: CHURCH (CHRISTIANITY IN ACTION)

BLOGS INDEX 6: CHAPTERS (BLOGS FROM BOOKS)

BLOGS INDEX 7: IMAGES (PHOTOS FROM BOOKS)

BACK TO MAIN PAGE